Pasties in Pak 'n Save contract

JAMIE SMALL
Last updated 05:00 01/04/2014
Cambridge’s Cornish Pasties
Chris Hillock/Fairfax NZ
RECIPE FOR SUCCESS: Cambridge’s Cornish Pasties owners, Neil and Melanie MacArthur, have a new deal to supply New World and Pak ’n Save in the South Island.

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Cornish pasties baked in Cambridge are heading to South Island supermarkets.

Melanie and Neil MacArthur have signed a deal with Foodstuffs, giving them the go-ahead to sell their pasties to New World and Pak 'n Save supermarkets in the South Island.

The couple, expats from England, own Cambridge business Cornish Pasties.

They started the business in late 2007 and began selling the baked pastries at farmers' markets around Waikato.

The MacArthurs signed a deal to supply North Island supermarkets last year. Their pasties are now stocked in nearly 80 supermarkets.

They still run stalls at weekly and monthly markets in Hamilton, Cambridge, Rotorua, Tamahere and Gordonton.

Neil MacArthur said about 450 of the 1500 pasties produced each week were sold at the weekly markets in a good week.

He was busy contacting the 60 Foodstuffs supermarkets in the South Island.

"I've already spoken to 30 of the stores, and only two or three of them aren't interested."

MacArthur said that, for the deliveries to be financially viable, he would have to send a pallet of around 500 pasties to the South Island once a week.

This would have to be produced in one day, a significant increase from the usual daily production of 300 pasties.

"In theory, we could start next week," said MacArthur. "We're going to go for it."

The bakery is looking for new part-time staff to help with the production increase.

MacArthur said that, while supermarkets paid less per pasty than punters at a market, they took more and made consistent orders.

Cafes around the country also bought from Cornish Pasties.

The Settlement cafe in Whangamata purchased 300 pasties last week to keep up with demand from the Beach Hop festival.

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- Waikato Times

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