Students join Moa ideas hunt

SIOBHAN LEATHLEY
Last updated 05:00 08/02/2013

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Execs from craft brewing company Moa judged a business case study competition at the University of Auckland last week – and got plenty in return thanks to creative ideas from the local university team.

The Champions Trophy competition, held at the university’s business school, gave 12 international teams five hours to scrutinise a real case study and develop a strategy to present to the judges. Universities from Singapore, America and Australia were among those represented.

Moa CEO Geoff Ross – joined in the judging group by the company’s non-executive officer Grant Baker, general manager Gareth Hughes and marketing director Sunil Unka – was impressed by the Kiwi team’s suggestions to help Moa’s offshore expansion plans.

“They mentioned useful online tactics that we’ll use,” says Ross.

He was keen to explore the team’s idea of Boss Hunting, a Facebook page targeting young, affluent men.

“It was very valuable feedback and I would love to have spent more time with them.”

The winning team, Pipin – from Chulalongkorn University in Thailand – found it challenging to get to grips with a company they’d never heard of.

“We don’t have Moa in Thailand, so it took some time to come to terms with it,” said team member Chote Jindaratanacholokij.

During the competition week, students also presented their thoughts on how to improve elements of a not for profit company, a listed company and a startup.

The competition is in its sixth year and this is the third time the University of Auckland has hosted it.  

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