Govt invites Chch innovators for pizza and beer

AMANDA SACHTLEBEN
Last updated 09:24 15/03/2013

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The government is asking potential tenants of the Christchurch Innovation Precinct to meet at a workshop on 25 March to say what they want from the space.

“There has already been considerable interest from multinational firms, smaller domestic firms, investors and developers,” says Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce.  “We want them to play their part in creating an environment that innovative firms and institutes want to locate to. The Innovation Precinct should be market-led – responding to the needs of business with a global mindset and ambitions.”

The workshop will be held over pizza and beer at the Canterbury Development Corporation. Potential tenants can give their vision for the Innovation Precinct, along with the accommodation size, facilitiates and services they’d need.

According to the request for proposal, the government then wants a firm commitment from interested parties so it can form a “consolidated potential tenant package” for developers.

The precinct will cover three city blocks bounded by Lichfield St, Manchester St, St Asaph St, High St, Tuam St and Madras St.

The document says the precinct’s primary focus is ICT, but the government wants to hear from any innovative organisation. Tenants will be able to access support services like business development consultancy, advice on growth, IP protection, mentoring and other services from “business-facing crown entities”.

Submissions close on 5 April.

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