How to get more out of LinkedIn

WILLIAM MACE
Last updated 05:00 28/03/2013

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Personal branding

Don’t be afraid to pimp your profile – LinkedIn is all about you, not your company or your boss. 

Think of it as an opportunity to detail the intricacies and highlights of your career that you’re a little shy to bang on about in person.

Providing that detail upfront will show your connections how you differ from their existing supplier, account manager or promotion prospect.

It’s a popularity contest

The founder of internet company Orcon, Seeby Woodhouse, uses the CardMunch iPhone app. He snaps a smartphone photo of each business card he receives and a LinkedIn employee enters the card’s information into his address book and connects him with the contact on LinkedIn.

Woodhouse says he respectfully gives the card back, so it not only saves him time and Rolodex space, but also saves trees.

The big plus with using LinkedIn to keep in touch with colleagues and clients is people are actively updating their contact information as they change roles, so you’ll never get left behind.

Woodhouse puts his database to good use by sending mass InMails [LinkedIn’s internal messaging mail] to most of his contacts about once a year.

William Mace has plenty more hot tips in his article in the April edition of Unlimited. Make sure you're signed up to get it in your inbox - visit unlimitedmagazine.co.nz

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