The 10 priciest shares in the world

PATRICK COMMINS
Last updated 10:29 19/08/2014
expensive shares

HIGH COST: Chocolate and football features in the world's most expensive shares.

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While the investment world fixates on Warren Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway stock cracking US$200,000  (NZ$ 235,000) per share for the first time, there are some other listed company where you'd get little change for that kind of money.

Take US-based Bactolac Pharmaceutical. Picking up one of the 9467 available shares on offer in the vitamin and supplement manufacturer costs a cool US$120,000; at least it did the last time there was a registered transaction in the stock, which Bloomberg says was in March.

Next priciest is Chocoladefabriken Lindt & Spruengli AG - better known as Lindt Chocolate. The Swiss-based confectioner's shares go for US$63,250 each, or you could instead plump for close to 16,000 blocks, or around 1600 kilos of the good stuff - which is the better investment?

Sporting clubs feature strongly in the top 10 priciest stocks in the world, which we have put together using S&P/Capital IQ data (see table above), limiting the universe to primary listed, common or preferred stock. The currency is US dollars, to keep it comparable with Berkshire's landmark achievement.

Not that the securities are necessarily liquid, as we've already seen.

For US$40,749 you can buy a piece of Chile's Sociedad Anonima de Deportes Club de Golf Santiago. Hopefully you get a round or two for that kind of dough as well. After hitting the fairways you may feel like trying your luck at the races, in which case let's hope you'd stumped up the US$17,628 for a single share in Club Hipico de Santiago.

Country Club of Virginia shares are a steal at US$25,000 each, while true Gunners fans can buy a piece of Arsenal Holdings for US$24,197.

The Pennsylvania-based South Chester Tube Company makes and sells metal hardware products and has a share price of US$22,500.

There are also some community banks in there, such as Mechanics Bank (US$17,000 a share) and New York's Country Bank Holding Company (US$16,000).

Sure, that's an odd grab-bag of businesses you wouldn't necessarily be able to buy into, even if you had the wherewithal and willingness to do so. But such outlandish company does highlight how freakishly successful Buffett's Berkshire Hathaway has been. And who knows how high it can go.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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