Vinyl record sales overtake digital music in UK

Vinyl sales have outstripped digital music sales for the first time in the UK.

Vinyl sales have outstripped digital music sales for the first time in the UK.

Vinyl records have returned to the mainstream with sales overtaking digital download sales for the first time in the UK.

A record 2.4 million pounds (NZD$4.2m) was spent on vinyl in the last week, out playing digital sales of 2.1 million pounds (NZD$3.7m).

It's a stark contrast from this time last year, where vinyl sales stood at 1.2 million and digital sales at 4.4 million. 

Vinyl is an increasingly popular Christmas gift.
Matt Cardy

Vinyl is an increasingly popular Christmas gift.

Despite a near-death experience in 2006, vinyl has grown in popularity for eight years consecutively, reports The Guardian

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Kim Bayley, chief executive of the Entertainment Retailers Association, said the surge was in part due to an increased number of retailers stocking records.

There has also been a resurgence in vinyl in New Zealand.
123RF

There has also been a resurgence in vinyl in New Zealand.

Another factor: Christmas. Vinyl is an increasingly popular gift.

"It used to be that only heritage acts or niche albums would come out as a record, but now everything does - pop albums, compilations, film soundtracks, all genres," Bayley told The Guardian.

A look at the top ten shows the diversity in vinyl purchases. Kate Bush, Amy Winehouse and Busted are there with the Guardian of the Galaxy film soundtrack and Now That's What I Call Christmas.

There has also been a resurgence in vinyl in New Zealand. 

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Recorded Music NZ figures show vinyl in 2016 accounts for around 10 per cent of the entire physical market, coming off a base of near zero in the early 2000s

Revenue from sales soared 116 per cent in New Zealand from 2013 to 2014, growing from $462,000 to just over $1 million, according to Radioscope, which compiles record sales for the Top 40.

But the resurgence of interest in vinyl hasn't helped Wellington's Death Ray Records.

The Newtown store is facing closure after a ballooning tax bill, competition with online retailers and low stock volumes.

 - Stuff

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