McDonald's staff advised to downsize

MICHAEL FOREMAN
Last updated 15:33 21/11/2013

Relevant offers

World

US state cashes in on autumn colours Danone says not eyeing Mead Johnson Australia's most dangerous jobs Virgin takes full control of Tigerair Slowing China inflation raises growth fears Kmart gets raspberry for see-through togs China slams CTI for misleading investors US stocks sink on Ebola, growth fears China central bank sees 'very low' risk G20 finance ministers frustrated

A McDonald's employee-only website called "McResource Line" which aims to help its US-based workers budget effectively and cope with life's everyday stresses, appears to be advising employees to eat less in order to reduce "holiday debt".

Screen shots from McResource Line, obtained by anti-low wage group Low Pay Is Not OK and posted on US gossip blog Gawker, show tips from the fast food company on how its workers can make ends meet over the holiday period.

Helpful tips on McResource Line include: "Breaking food into pieces often results in eating less and still feeling full."

Under the heading "Tightening Your Belt," McResource Line advises workers to consider returning or selling unwanted holiday purchases.

"You may also want to consider returning some of your unopened purchases that may not seem appealing as they did. Selling some of your unwanted possessions on eBay or Craigslist could bring in some quick cash," the website says.

Meanwhile, employees are urged to complain less to avoid stress - "stress hormone levels rise by 15 per cent after 10 minutes of complaining".

The McResource Line also advises taking up singing: "Singing along to your favorite songs can lower your blood pressure."

McDonald's New Zealand communications manager Simon Kenny said the company did not operate a similar website here.

"We have an intranet which is loaded up with all sorts of training modules but it doesn't have any content like that," he said.

Kenny added that the McResource Line advice to complain less probably should not be taken to mean that employees should not complain at work, as some US commentators had suggested.

Ad Feedback

- Fairfax Media

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content