Vatican bank's 'technical error'

NICOLE WINFIELD
Last updated 08:00 31/01/2014

Relevant offers

World

Sue Finley, 80, was hired by Nasa in 1958 as a 'computer' Woman gets $8030 but fails in bid to sue Australian supermarket after slipping on a grape Kayak is letting travellers search for travel deals using emojis Uber CEO Travis Kalanick resigns under investor pressure George Clooney sells his tequila to Diageo for US$1 billion London fire: Luxury apartments acquired for displaced Grenfell tenants Aussie bankers drug colleague with valium and laxatives in attempt to discredit him Passengers set to pay as Uber introduces tipping and fees for keeping drivers waiting Bauer's Australia boss quits, replaced by New Zealand CEO, after Rebel Wilson defamation case Apple gives the iPad some love to halt its long slide

The Associated Press has learned that Vatican bank told dozens of widows and pensioners to close their accounts or risk losing access to their money, then back-tracked and said it was all a "technical error."

The embarrassment comes as the institution is trying to fend off accusations of mismanagement and corruption.

"In some cases old ladies got nasty letters," Max Hohenberg, spokesman for the Institute for Religious Works told The AP.

Bank President Ernst Von Freyberg penned a terse letter to clients telling them to their money out because they no longer fit the criteria of account-holders set by the board. Somehow former Vatican employees and their widows got caught up in the sweep, apparently because of the way their accounts were classified by the bank internally.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content