Mainzeal collapse stalls council move

Last updated 12:27 13/02/2013
Greater Wellington Regional Council Building
The Greater Wellington regional council building in Wakefield St, which has been assessed as meeting only 30 per cent of the current building standard.

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Greater Wellington regional council's plans to rehouse its head office staff in a safer building on the waterfront may be stalled for some time following the collapse of Mainzeal construction.

Work on a major upgrade of Shed 39 to accommodate the council was halted last week when receivers were called in.

Mainzeal had just work on the $3 million upgrade of the former wharf shed and council was scheduled to move its staff into the building in May or June.

Shed 39, which was leased to TelstraClear, was 60 per cent of the seismic code. The plan was to bring it fully up to code, said Centreport property manager Nick Wareham.

He said Mainzeal started on the project early in the new year and they were only about 5 per cent of the way when the site was locked down by the receiver.

They had set up their base, done earthworks for new foundations around the building and put in reinforcing.

He said Centreport were waiting to hear back from the receivers on whether they planned to abandon the project or on options for restarting it.

The regional council decided to relocate its 250 staff after engineers found major flaws with its present headquarters, opposite the Michael Fowler Centre in Wakefield St.

The 10-storey block, built in the 1980s, was assessed as only 30 per cent of new building standard and it could fail in a major or even moderate earthquake.

It was built on liquefaction-prone soft soil for which its foundations were not designed, among other serious faults.

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- The Dominion Post

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