Food and film are just the ticket

Silver screen's Middle-earth joins food fest

ALISA YONG
Last updated 08:44 26/08/2014
Roxy wide
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FEAST FOR THE EYES: The Roxy Cinema's Dilhani Bandaranayake and Weta technician Sofia Bue paint up a treat for Wednesday's Unwrapping The Art of Food event.

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The magic of Middle-earth is coming to the Roxy Cinema for a special Visa Wellington On a Plate event that combines two of the things Wellington does best: Food and film.

Food-themed sets from Laketown, Rivendell, Hobbiton and Beorn's table from The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit will be transforming the cinema tomorrow.

Fans will be able to sample rustic Middle-earth-style dishes from Roxy's restaurant Coco, as well as meeting the food technicians and set dressers who helped create the sets.

Roxy event manager Carole Tredea says the event will give people the chance to see how food is made for films.

"It's a once in a lifetime opportunity for film and food fans to see what's involved in bringing food to life.

"Guests will have access to props that have never been seen outside of closed movie sets, and be able to meet some of the world's leading artists and set designers."

Diners will also receive a ticket to The Weta Cave workshop tour, which allows guests to see the work being done inside the workshop where design and physical effects are created.

Weta special effects technician Sofia Bue, who helped mould and paint props for The Hobbit, says it is a rare opportunity to show the public what goes on behind the scenes.

"It's always nice being able to share what you did - it's usually such a secret."

Prop technician Ben Whale, who has worked on movies such as Avatar, The Last Samurai, and King Kong as well as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, says working with food can be challenging.

"You can buy things like fake fruit which is made in China, but generally that doesn't look real enough. Usually whenever there's food in the shoot it's quite hard work."

Crew can spend about a week creating realistic-looking fakes such as the gelatine catfish that Andy Serkis, who played Gollum, ate in The Two Towers.

However, occasionally real food, such as bread, can be used. The loaves are made especially salty so they last through filming.

MORE INFO

More information about Unwrapping the Art of Food in Film is available on the Wellington On a Plate website.

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- The Dominion Post

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