Pair's design skills for Africa

SOPHIE SPEER
Last updated 05:00 23/01/2013
Marly Doyle and Bridget Nicholas
PHIL REID/Fairfax NZ

INTO AFRICA: Bridget Nicholas, left and Marly Doyle are heading to Jinja, Uganda, to work with Matooke Design, which helps support the local community by providing sustainable income and vocational skills.

Relevant offers

Capital Day

Carter and McGlashan team up for music festival Guides 'cup of tea and biscuit experience' remains 60 years on The man helping shut the justice system's 'revolving door' Like father, like son: youngster makes kids' menu at Waikanae restaurant Wellington Museum to open new exhibition space, Flux, targeting 18-30 year olds Wellington's Toi Maori Art Market arrives late thanks to November earthquake Maoriland Film Festival returns to Otaki with headline show set in Vanuatu New Lower Hutt hair salon purpose-built for sustainability Wellington teenager Thomasin McKenzie lands lead movie role in US film My Abandonment Taofi Mose-Tuiloma's lands first role in Kiwi movie Gary of the Pacific

Two Wellingtonians are planning to use their tailoring and pattern-making skills to help fashion entrepreneurs in Uganda.

Marly Doyle, 31, and Bridget Nicholas, 24 are planning to spend three and six months respectively working with Matooke Design, a small design business based in Jinja, the second biggest town in Uganda.

The business was set up to give practical vocational training in creative industries such as textiles, fashion and jewellery making, and allow those involved to become self-sufficient.

Ms Doyle, who studied design, is planning to use her knowledge of pattern-making and fashion to help the company become more efficient.

She most recently worked in costume breakdown on The Hobbi trilogy, where she got to make costumes muddy, ripped and bloody for battle scenes. Other experience includes making jewellery, a big part of Matooke Design, in which paper is used to create colourful beads.

Ms Doyle says the company has begun selling internationally, and she wants to help it put processes in place to regulate size and shape, so the necklaces can be created efficiently. ''It's about basic things like standardising the way something is cut out and teaching them how to use tools they may not have access to, like specific equipment for pattern-making.''

Ms Nicholas has been studying design and textiles at Massey University and sells her vintage craft creations on etsy.com.

She hopes to learn as much from the Ugandan people as she teaches them. ''I will share what I believe in about design ... it's a really exciting opportunity.''

Their trips will cost about $8000 each, so the pair have been fundraising through crowd sourcing website Pledge Me. They hope to raise the first sum before the end of the month to allow Ms Nicholas to travel first, with Ms Doyle hoping to arrive in April.

THE DETAILS

Find out more about their plan at their Facebook page.

Contact Sophie Speer
Culture and Capital Day reporter
Email: sophie.speer@dompost.co.nz
Twitter: @sophie_speer

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Comments

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content