Letter: The value that arts graduates deliver

Last updated 12:00 24/01/2013

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OPINION: Though it's true that a medicine graduate might earn up to three times that of a performing arts graduate (Jan 22), Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce's comments about a move away from fine arts and performing arts being ''good for the economy'' are trivial. New Zealand recently celebrated the premiere of The Hobbit, which not only advanced our prestige in the international film industry, but fell definitively within the fine arts.

While overseas, upon telling people I was from New Zealand, I found their first comments would be about the Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit.

Creative arts were what people instantly thought about and recognised.

An arts degree isn't necessarily about making the most money you can.

It's about thinking creatively, learning about people, society, and the world and being able to communicate with others from different countries through language, film, and music.

Furthermore, creative-arts graduates have direct interaction with the public, influencing morale and culture that we pride ourselves on.

Though engineering and medicine will always be of the highest priority, especially in light of the Christchurch earthquakes, the communication and thinking skills of an Arts graduate are also good for the economy.

EMILY WILBY

Island Bay

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- The Dominion Post

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