Laptops, glasses and a child left on buses

BRONWYN TORRIE
Last updated 05:00 28/01/2013
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A child, a dozen bottles of cider and hundreds of umbrellas were left on the capital's buses last year.

Go Wellington has collected more than 4000 items since last January including soft toys, prescription glasses, wallets and hard hats.

Laptops and cameras have also been left on seats and never picked up, administration assistant Heather Graham said.

"Many people ring up and ask me to stop the bus or make the driver come back, which is not viable, that is why the lost property line is an answerphone."

In the past 12 months nearly 7600 people had left messages to see if their precious possessions had turned up in the lost property room.

Nearly 1600 pieces of lost property had been returned to its rightful owners, but the remainder was shipped off to charity after three months of sitting idle.

Sunglasses and reading glasses go to the Fred Hollows Foundation, which helps restore sight to people in Pacific islands.

Phones are sent to Starship Hospital's mobile phone appeal and all clothing goes to the Salvation Army or Mary Potter Hospice, Miss Graham said.

Luckily, the child accidently left on a bus by her mother was old enough to tell the driver what school she went to. "The mother thought she got off with her. The bus driver took her to the school and left her at the reception."

Another mother left a push chair on the bus after her child "took a run for it" when the bus stopped. She had to chase the child and ditch the push chair, but later collected it, Miss Graham said.

School bags are frequently left by pupils, but umbrellas are the most common thing passengers forget.

Miss Graham attempts to contact the owners of lost wallets or phones, and of those she had informed there were 142 who had not gone down to the Kilbirnie depot to pick up their property.

Contact Bronwyn Torrie
Health reporter
Email: bronwyn.torrie@dompost.co.nz
Twitter: @brontorrie

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- The Dominion Post

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