Man admits attack on Wellington builder

JILL NICHOLAS AND BLAIR ENSOR
Last updated 12:38 26/02/2013
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PHIL REID/Fairfax NZ

SERIOUS INJURIES: Robert Bryden, centre, who is still recovering from his injuries, with his family on Waikanae Beach.

Ioritana Tuau
Ioritana Tuau

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Vicki Bryden will never forgive the man who destroyed the ‘‘hopes and dreams’’ of her family when he beat her son to within an inch of his life on Tory St.

She wants Ioritana Tuau, 22, to be sent to prison "for a long time" when he’s sentenced at the High Court in Wellington in April.

Tuau pleaded guilty to wounding with intent to cause grievous bodily harm to Robert Bryden, who was 25 at the time of the attack in Wellington on September 11, 2011.

Justice Pamela Andrews convicted him at the High Court in Rotorua this morning and remanded him on temporary bail for sentencing at Wellington High Court in April.

Mrs Bryden said the guilty plea came as a huge relief to her family. They had been worried about details they might hear during the course of a trial.

‘‘I’ve been prepared for the worst and I’ve been worried sick about it. It’s a huge relief. It’s just gutting that it’s taken him 18 months to own up to it.

‘‘There are other people involved and I know in my mind he knows who they are and he’s protecting them.

‘‘He’s never shown any remorse to us what-so-ever. That’s hard to take as well.’’

She wants the judge to throw the book at him when he appears for sentencing.

‘‘Lock him away for a long time.

‘‘He’s destroyed the hopes and dreams for people.

‘‘Robert should be out living his life – getting a girl, getting married. That’s not going to happen for a long time.

‘‘It’s not just my family. It’s the people he [Robert] was with on the night. It’s torture for them. No one’s a winner. It’s just a horrible situation.’’

Her son’s condition was improving slowly, but he still had no memory retention and no recollection of the attack, she said. Robert could now engage in conversation when before it was only ‘‘yes and no answers’’.

‘‘It’s still fairly basic stuff.

‘‘He’ll ask the same question a hundred times a day because he can’t remember the answer.’’

Justice Andrews temporarily bailed Tuau until March because his partner gave birth two days ago, and also to give him a chance to see his brother and sister who have been overseas for some years before he was sentenced.

Neatly dressed in a burgundy shirt and tie, Taua appeared in the dock clutching a bible and outside the court a dozen people who had supported him from the public gallery held a prayer gathering.

Tuau's mother declined to comment until her son's sentencing.

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- The Dominion Post

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