Twenty-thousand turn out for Mission Concert

TRACEY CHATTERTON
Last updated 08:44 24/02/2013

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There was a little bit of Jive Talking' and a lot of Night Fever at the annual Mission Concert in Napier last night.

As the gates opened punters sprinted past the vines towards a prime spot in the paddock to throw out their picnic rug.

A crowd of almost 20,000 soaked up the last of the afternoon sun at the Mission Estate winery.


What did you think of the concert? Give us your reviews below.


Pop Star priest Father Chris Skinner warmed up the audience with You Raise Me Up.

The Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra were a ray of sunshine in their colourful ensemble and their catchy tunes.

But it was the voices of Carole King and Barry Gibb everyone was waiting to hear.

Although it didn't matter who was on stage for a group of Wairarapa women.

They have been "making a weekend of it" for the past couple of years.

They dressed up as buzzy bees for Sting, and wore Rod Stewart' family tartan to last year's concert.

As a "sixties baby" it made sense for Karen Haines and her girlfriends to come dressed as hippies. They wore floral headbands for Carole King and rose-coloured glasses in memory of Robin Gibb.

Every year they left their men and children at home and headed to Hawke's Bay for a girls weekend away,  where they "started giggling on Friday and finished giggling on Sunday".

It was the buzzing atmosphere that brought them back year after year.

And they had plenty of stories to tell. Tracey Smith snapped her knee during Tom Jonses' set while dancing to Sex Bomb in 2008. A couple of years earlier, Ms Haines was rushed to hospital during the B-52s set with a ruptured appendix.

But it didn't put the group off, and they were on their feet by the time Carole King belted out It's Too Late.

And when Barry Gibb took to the stage and belted out Jive Talkin' the paddock was alight with glow sticks as the crowd got into the disco fever. They weren't fussed that two of the group were no longer around as they grooved to Lonley Days, More Than a Woman and Spicks and Specks.

Guest appearances by Gibbs' son Steve and niece Samantha kept the show alive until culminating in the classics Night Fever with Stayin' Alive for the encore.

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- The Dominion Post

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