Little blue takes a bath

Last updated 14:39 18/06/2014

Relevant offers

Hutt Valley

Wellington woman Annemarie Treadwell's death trigger for Police euthanasia furore Mental health workers clock up big hours Community Patrol making its mark 'Gun' seen in Upper Hutt not what it seemed Rare Sir Ian Athfield-designed house in seaside suburb on market for first time in more than 40 years Young female carpenter urges other girls to give it a go Fighting for the best of causes Elderslea aged care chef recognised again Rimutaka prisoners on the tools in bike recycling scheme Cool Aeronautics comes to Pinehaven

It had the whole sea to swim in, but one little blue penguin decided it rather fancied a bath.

The penguin was found stuck in an outdoor bath in Eastbourne, Lower Hutt, yesterday morning.

Holiday cottage manager Lynne Plimmer got a call from her tenants saying the penguin needed rescuing after spending the night at her seaside property.

"Honestly, I couldn't believe it. I thought, 'I'm hearing things'," Plimmer said.

"Maybe it thought it was the sea or something and jumped in in the dark."

In her 12 years living in Eastbourne, Plimmer had seen only half a dozen of the shy penguins, the smallest of their species.

"They tend to go under houses and rocks," she said. "To see one in a bath is quite extraordinary."

It took five people to pick up the penguin with the aid of a towel, and it was then taken to the beach in a recycling bin, Plimmer said.

The penguin happily swam away, looking back just once.

Holidaying couple Linda and Graham Cresswell, from Birmingham in England, rang a vet, the SPCA and a Department of Conservation ranger when they found the penguin at their cottage.

They did not at first realise how special an encounter with a little blue penguin was, Linda Cresswell said.

"Being from the UK, we just thought, 'Hello, who's that in the bath?' " she said.

Homeowners should generally leave little blue penguins alone if they visited a property, Eastbourne forest ranger Ray Smith said.

"They come onshore because they want to rest a bit. They don't want to be interfered with," he said.

If it was necessary to move a penguin that was stuck or in the line of traffic, Smith advised wearing gloves because the penguins' beaks were sharp and strong.

The breeding season, when penguins most commonly came to shore, began in October, he said.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

How many coffees do you have a day?

5 or even more




Anything from 1-5.

Don't touch the stuff.

Vote Result

Related story: Coffee as we know it at risk of dying

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content