Kapiti erosion risk may devalue 1800 homes

KAY BLUNDELL
KAPITI REPORTER
Last updated 12:32 27/08/2012
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Up to 1000 properties may be at risk within 50 years, with another within 100 years, according to a new Coastal Erosion Hazard Risk report.

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Jenny Rowan
Mayor Jenny Rowan said the new shoreline predictions could come as a shock to some coastal property owners.

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Up to 1800 of Kapiti's wealthiest beachfront properties may be devalued after a report revealed they will be at risk from erosion and flooding.

Up to 1000 properties may be at risk within 50 years, with another 800 within 100 years, according to a new Coastal Erosion Hazard Risk report.

The information, released at a press conference today, is likely to affect property values and insurance as it will be included in future Land Information Memoranda (LIMs).

The council has sent letters to the 1800 affected property owners today advising them of the report, including neighbourhood maps showing 50 - 100-year shoreline predictions.

Kapiti Coast District Council commissioned leading coastal science company Coastal Systems to carry out the report, which was peer-reviewed before being presented to the council.

Mayor Jenny Rowan said the new shoreline predictions could come as a shock to some coastal property owners.

"This report brings home the reality, however, that we have a very low coastal fringe that is both open to rising sea levels and damage from storms.

"The issue of climate change, rising sea levels and changes in weather patterns has been around for some time.

"However, I suspect a number of people have seen this debate as largely one for green activists and have not been engaged."

Waikanae community board chairman Michael Scott said people's property values will inevitably go down, which could result in lower rates payments.

He said the information would be quite scary for people at first.

"They will think their properties will be washed away imminently and it is all doom and gloom.

"These are worst-case scenarios. They need to understand what the 50 and 100 year level actually mean."

The issues raised from the report will be considered as part of the current district plan review.

The Government's New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement 2010 requires all local territorial authorities to carry out a coastal hazard assessment within a 100 year outlook.

Do you think your property will be affected? Contact our newsroom at news@dompost.co.nz

Related story: Raumati sea wall will cost hundreds of thousands

Contact Kay Blundell
Kapiti reporter
Email: kay.blundell@dompost.co.nz

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