Kapiti expressway: The story so far

Last updated 08:47 13/11/2012

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Kapiti

$1.5m to sell Kimberley Centre Rehab unit gets princely listing Anti-fluoride campaigner loses case Crash leaves council with a costly repair job to wall Burning toast prompts pool evacuation Outspoken councillor subject of 'witch-hunt' Trains back in action after fire Out-of-town library fee on hold Man jailed for sexual offences against two young girls No chance to overturn attack sentence

August 2009: Transport Minister Steven Joyce proposes two new options to reduce SH1 congestion, both of them four-lane expressways from McKays Crossing to Peka Peka. Up to 300 properties are affected.

November 2010: The NZTA unveils a new route, adding a fourth interchange at Paraparaumu and destroying formerly unaffected properties at Raumati South and Waikanae. Up to 86 properties are affected.

May 2011: NZTA revises the route yet again, taking out 43 homes and affecting a further 33 properties. The new alignment also slices off the eastern corner of sacred Maori land at Waikanae.

January 2012: New design changes and cost estimates are announced, bumping the McKays to Peka Peka cost from $550m to $630m.

April 2012: NZTA lodges its application for regulatory consents with the Environmental Protection Agency.

July 2012: Environment Minister Amy Adams directs the application to a board of inquiry to fast-track the process.

WHAT IS A BOARD OF INQUIRY?

An independent board appointed by the environment minister for deciding whether a proposal should be granted resource consent. It is often used for nationally significant projects as it is considered quicker than the normal consent process administered by local government.

WHO SITS ON IT?

Sir John Hansen (chairman)

High Court judge from 1995 to 2008. Appointed chairman of Red Cross Canterbury Earthquake Commission in September 2010.

Environment Commissioner David Bunting

A member of the board of inquiry for the Turitea wind farm near Palmerston North. Before joining the Environment Court, he was a senior executive with one of New Zealand's largest infrastructure consulting firms.

Glenice Paine

Accredited Resource Management Act decision-maker who sat on the Transmission Gully board of inquiry. Of Te Atiawa and Ngai Tahu descent.

Mark Apeldoorn

An accredited hearings commissioner with significant local government and private sector experience, specialising in traffic and transport for over 20 years. Has been a principal expert adviser to public and private sector clients, council hearings and Environment Court.

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- The Dominion Post

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