College film inspired by youth culture

Last updated 10:34 21/08/2012
Andrea O'Neil
PROFESSIONAL: Student film-makers Rihana Rehen, Dakota MacDonald and Amanda Faauga, with Porirua College performing arts head of department Karl Payne, have produced a short film examining school culture.

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When three Porirua College student film-makers were tasked with recording inspirational New Zealanders for a short film competition, they didn't need to look further than their fellow students.

The resulting seven-minute film, Culture at PC, will be screened this Thursday at Pataka alongside inspiring documentaries from students and professional film- makers around the country.

Budding documentary-makers Amanda Faauga, 16, Rihana Rehen, 16, and Dakota MacDonald, 14, attended a day-long film storytelling workshop in June with their film tutor, Karl Payne.

The workshop was run by the Inspiring Stories Trust, which held workshops throughout New Zealand this winter teaching skills to creative teens. Attendees were encouraged to make their own films, to be judged by top film- makers in November.

The multicultural mix at Porirua College was what inspired Culture at PC, Amanda says.

"Our school is multicultural and a lot of people don't see that, they just see it as the naughty college," she says.

The trio interviewed fellow students about what culture meant to them.

"People did agree that culture was more than heritage or blood. Some people were saying it was society or ideas or just hanging around with your friends," Rihana says.

Footage of student cultural performances is shown between interviews.

The team worked every day after school for a month to edit the film and pulled a five-hour shift after school the day before the competition closed.

Feedback from the trust has been overwhelmingly positive - the film was slick and professionally shot, the students were told.

"We were really buzzed out when that happened," Rihana says. "It was all worth it."

Inspiring Stories film-maker Lu Davidson describes Culture at PC as "epic".

"It blew me away. It was really professionally done," she says.

Watch Culture at PC at the Inspiring Stories film screening, August 23, 6pm till 8pm at Pataka, or online at 46666905.

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