A street fair with an important message

LUCY JOHNSTON
Last updated 11:52 09/10/2012
Kim Boyce-Campbell

Kim Boyce-Campbell: "We need to know and care for our neighbours.”

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The Wellingtonian

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Organisers of Sunday's Tennyson St Fair regard it not only as a time of celebration, but as an important step in emergency preparedness.

The fair is being hosted by Elim International Church in conjunction with the Wellington City Council, and features live music, dance, children's entertainment, stalls and a huge variety of ethnic food.

Highlights will include performances from blues man Darren Watson, soul singer Kemara Fuimaono and the Downtown Community Ministry's Ukelele Orchestra.

Tennyson St runs off Cambridge Tce.

One of the fair's main organisers, film-maker Kim Boyce-Campbell, said the idea to hold a fair arose after the Christchurch earthquakes.

Mrs Boyce-Campbell recently produced a series of documentaries called The New Normal, which examined the impact of earthquakes on churches and faith communities.

“After the quakes it became clear that churches play an incredibly important role in sustaining people through times of stress,” she said.

Mrs Boyce-Campbell formed a group at Elim International Church to discuss how communities could better connect in preparation for natural disasters.

She said the group included people with a diverse range of interests and skills, such as former international emergency relief worker Julia Mitchell.

“We realised that should ‘the big one' hit Wellington, our church is ideally positioned to help people get through, but most people living in our neighbourhood wouldn't even know we're here.

"We need to know and care for our neighbours.”

During the fair a survey team will circulate, asking people about what they would like to see happen to enhance community in the CBD. They will also be giving people information about being prepared for a disaster and giving out prizes.

Water containers and survival packs will also be for sale.

The fair kicks off at 11am and runs until 2.30pm.

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- The Wellingtonian

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