Online guide for keen walkers

BY JIM CHIPP
Last updated 09:23 07/11/2012

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The Wellingtonian

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Sunday strollers, hardy trampers and everybody in between will have no excuse for straying on to private property or sacred land in future.

The New Zealand Walking Access Commission launched the Both Sides of the Fence website at Northland School last Friday.

It is designed for 8 to-13-year-old school pupils to learn responsible land access behaviour.

Commission chief executive Mark Neeson said scenarios were presented from multiple perspectives to help reconnect urban and rural New Zealand by improving mutual understanding of the value of access and the realities of rural life.

The website also has links to the commission’s walking access maps, which detail real and paper roads and other areas walkers are able to use.

One of the site’s creators,nteSite co-creator David Copeland, the commission’s digital strategist, was there to talk about it. As a child he and friends used to play on a hill known to be peppered with disused mine shafts.

‘‘We knew, and nteOur parents made it very clear, that if we went up to Arnot’s Hill, we had to tell somebody, and there were parts we weren’t allowed to go to.’’

That was the kind of local knowledge that had been included in the website, he said.

Visit the website at bothsidesofthefence.org.nz.

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- The Wellingtonian

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