Churches come together to run Karori foodbank

NATASHA THYNE
Last updated 09:40 09/11/2012
Karori foodbank
NATASHA THYNE
Joint venture: Ray Coats, chairman of the Karori Foodbank Transition Group, with the donation box at St Anselms Church in Makara Rd.

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Five Karori churches are coming together as a community to run the Karori Foodbank from next year.

The merger, which starts in April, will allow members of Karori churches to manage the foodbank as a joint venture.

It is currently managed by St Teresa's Catholic Church, although other churches support it by providing volunteers and donating food.

The five churches are St Mary's Anglican Church, St Teresa's Catholic Church, St Ninian's Uniting Church, St Anselms Union Church and Karori Baptist Church.

Each would each have a representative on the new management board, said Ray Coats, chairman of the Karori Foodbank Transition Group.

"We will be able to widen the scope of the volunteers who are already there and the activities that the foodbank's been doing," he said.

There will also be a five-person team responsible for looking after accounts, fundraising and events, purchasing and shelving food, and volunteer rosters.

Mr Coats said most churches would donate food each Sunday and help with the fundraising events, usually in the mall, where they collected food.

Karori foodbank co-ordinator Chris Bolland said each food parcel contained 30 items, including fresh supermarket items bought the night before delivery and non-perishable donated food.

He said that judging by supermarket prices, each parcel was worth about $110.

"Typical clients are women in their 30s with children.[They] may have a partner, but may not."

Started by St Teresa's in 1992, the foodbank - located at the Karori community centre and costing $2000 a year to run - has 28 volunteers and delivers food each Tuesday and Friday.

In the year ending March 31, 2012, the foodbank supplied 520 food parcels to people in Karori.

The foodbank, which gets its food from donations and cash donations from the St John's Op shop trust, is one of 22 around Wellington.

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