Street history: Bould St

ADRIANA WEBER
Last updated 09:29 23/11/2012

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The Wellingtonian

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Several streets in the Wellington area are named after prominent settlers and their families.

One of those is Bould St, which stretches 550 metres off Broderick Rd in Johnsonville.

The dead-end street is named after the pioneering Bould family, who for several decades were regarded as the aristocracy of Johnsonville.

Robert Bould was a pioneer farmer who travelled to Wellington with the New Zealand Company in the early 1840s.

In 1853 Mr Bould bought land in what is now Kipling St and initially used it to farm sheep. He is said to have been the first sheep farmer in the Johnsonville area.

In about 1860 Mr Bould built Daisy Hill Farmhouse (also known as Bould House), which still stands in Truscott Ave.

The building, which is category one heritage-listed, is among Wellington's oldest remaining houses. The two-storey weatherboard house was built in a simplified Georgian style.

Mr Bould later became involved in Johnsonville's growing sports scene and frequently offered his land for cricket matches.

In 1864, one of Johnsonville's earliest cricket games, between the United Eleven and Porirua Cricketers, was held on Mr Bould's paddock.

When Robert Bould died in 1875, his son, also named Robert, took over the farm.

Robert junior was strongly involved in the community.

He became chairman of the Johnsonville Town Board and helped found the lodge of Oddfellows. He was also a member of the Johnsonville School committee.

In the 1900s the Bould family land was the site of the local trotting club's racetrack. From 1913 till 1927 a nine-hole golf course was also sited on the land.

During the 20th century the land around Bould St changed dramatically.

A large number of state houses were built in the street, which went from being mostly farmland to a busy residential area.

It became even more valuable once the Johnsonville Mall was built in the late 1960s, because of its proximity.

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- The Wellingtonian

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