Cardboard creations for charity

ADRIANA WEBER
Last updated 10:33 27/11/2012

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The Wellingtonian

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Pupils from Island Bay School have been getting creative with cardboard as part of a charity fundraiser.

For the past two weeks pupils from the school have been constructing a giant cardboard house as part of a nationwide cardboard house-building competition.

The competition is sponsored by the Anglican Diocese, the Child Poverty Action Group and Unicef and aims to raise awareness about the cold, damp rental houses that many New Zealanders live in.

Teacher Shanon Overly has played a key role in organising the event at the school and said that the competition had been a great opportunity to teach pupils about the conditions children living in poverty have to face.

"It has been a great way for children to learn that there are kids out there in need," she said.

"The kids have really enjoyed the process of making the house and have loved feeling like they can do their part to help out."

Miss Overly said that while most of the work on the house had been completed in the past few weeks, the children had been making decorations for it for most of the school term.

The cardboard house, which comes complete with a welcome mat, can fit more than six standing adults inside it.

"It's been such a huge task and we really couldn't have done it without all the help we received from parents, staff members and pupils," she said.

The school had an open day for the house, when pupils collected donations and took parents and members of the community for a tour through their cardboard creation.

The money raised from the open day will be donated to the Habitat for Humanity charity.

Heath Marks, 8, said she thought her school's cardboard house deserved to win the competition.

"Our house is the best! But if we don't win we'll still be helping other kids," she said.

The winning entry for the competition will receive free ceiling insulation or the chance to nominate another school to receive the prize.

Island Bay School's Lachlan McKeown, 8, left, and Maia Vertongen, 8, stand proudly in front of the house they built, and Harvey Lye, 8, peek out from the cardboard window. Photo: ADRIANA WEBER

Heath Marks shows off the "insy winsy spider" that lives in her class's cardboard house. Photo: ADRIANA WEBER

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