Exploring the world at Fringe

TALIA CARLISLE
Last updated 13:49 22/01/2013
Sam Prebble
Weaving a tale: Sam Prebble will be bringing explorers Earnest Shackleton and Robert Scott to life through music and story-telling.

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The Wellingtonian

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Stories of courage, intense hardship and exploration will be retold during the Wellington Fringe Festival.

The Explorers Club: Antarctica brings to life, through music and illustrations, the adventures of explorers Robert Scott and Ernest Shackleton.

Inspired by the stories of Scott and Shackleton, Wellington songwriter Sam Prebble produced a series of songs about shipwrecks, frostbite and stiff-upper-lip survival.

Prebble will take to the stage for the February 16 with musicians Ivy Rossiter and Brendan Turner.

"I'll be playing fiddle and guitar, and Ivy Rossiter will be singing and playing percussion and Brendan Turner will be playing upright bass. But we all sing, and we're really enjoying the vocal harmonies at the moment."

The Fringe production is re-invention of an earlier music show, during which Prebbel started to tell stories between songs.

"I found the audiences just really responded to hearing more about the background to each of the songs."

He said the adventures of Soctt and Shackelton were fantastic stories.

In 1912 Scott led a five-man expedition to be the first to reach the South Pole - only to discover he had been beaten by Norwegian explorer Roald Amundsen.

Scott and his expedition then faced starvation and intense cold during the journey back across the Antarctic.

Meanwhile, Shackleton attempted a trans-Antarctic journey, but struck trouble when his ship Endurance was trapped and crushed in pack ice.

One of the explorers survived their respective expedition - one didn't.

"It's a subject that's quite dear to my heart," Prebble said. "I've just been fascinated by the story of Captain Scott to begin with," said Prebble.

Since their expeditions in the early twentieth century, Scott and Shackleton have been lauded as heroes, but also ridiculed as fools for the risks they took.

"I think the thing I've really come to realise about all of these guys is that, win or lose, what they did was remarkable," said Prebble.

"It was just so far beyond the experiences of anyone that I know. I can't judge them."

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- The Wellingtonian

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