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Large rubbish bins being trialled in Wgtn

AMY JACKMAN
Last updated 09:11 28/02/2013

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The Wellingtonian

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Wellington City Council is to launch a $70,000 rubbish bin trial aimed at making it easier to keep Wellington litter-free.

A new style of street bin made from stainless steel will be used.

It will be big enough to contain a wheelie bin.

The council provides about 1500 bins in Wellington, including the suburbs.

The council's city networks manager, Stavros Michael, said up to 20 new bins could start appearing in high-profile areas, such as Oriental Bay, within the next few weeks.

The cost of the trial is yet to be finalised, but would be about $70,000, he said.

"The trial of the new big bins is based on the desire to provide more capacity for rubbish and possibly reduce the need to empty them several times a day, especially in busy spots around the city," he said.

"The bins could simply be wheeled out to the truck hoist, which means less lugging of heavy weight for the people doing the emptying."

The council has so far fixed or replaced 129 bins at a cost of $53,000 since last July.

In the 2011/2012 financial year, it fixed or replaced 161 rubbish bins at a cost of $98,000.

Mr Michael said most of the bins were replaced because of general wear and tear.

"Just the activity of emptying the bins wears them out over time and they are gradually replaced as necessary," he said.

"Vehicles also back into them and damage them in some places. Some bins also catch fire, but that doesn't happen too often.

"Outright vandalism or arson isn't such a big factor, but carelessness with stubbing out and getting rid of cigarettes is probably a bigger problem.

"We're always looking at new designs that are tougher, but which don't look too much like a World War II gun emplacement."

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- The Wellingtonian

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