Tracking the rail trail

Last updated 10:33 07/11/2012

Onwards and upwards: Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae leads the official party on the Rimutaka Rail Trail near Summit with Graeme Juppnts, president of the Fell Locomotive Museum in Featherston.

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Upper Hutt Leader

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The Queen's representative had a taste of the weather railway workers battled for more than 70 years when he led an anniversary walk of the Rimutaka Rail Trail on Saturday.

More than 180 people took part in the walk.

The rail trail was opened 25 years ago on the railway formation from Kaitoke to Summit and down to Cross Creek on the Rimutaka Incline with its famous Fell engines.

Governor-General Sir Jerry Mateparae and his wife Lady Mateparae retraced the walk 25 years ago by then Governor- General Sir Paul Reeves and Lady Reeves on November 1, 1987.

The Upper Hutt Leader reported that walk was on a sunny but windy day.

Last Saturday it was raining with the forecast for even wetter weather as the day progressed.

As at the opening, there were refreshments for all at a windy but this time wet Summit before the walk down the steep incline to Cross Creek and waiting buses for the return trip to Upper Hutt or a walk back to Kaitoke.

The vice-regal couple were collected from Summit by their driver who had come in over the logging track off the Rimutaka Hill Rd.

The rail trail remains popular with walkers, runners and cyclists who number about 36,000 every year.

Wellington Regional Council chairwoman Fran Wilde has described the route as a national treasure that includes the steepest section of railway line ever built in New Zealand and examples of rail heritage that include tunnels and bridges and remnants of old locomotives on display at Summit.

Those who took part in the walk included Ms Wilde, regional councillor Nigel Wilson, South Wairarapa mayor Adrienne Staples, DOC Wellington Hawke's Bay acting conservator Ben Reddiex and the chair of the Rail Heritage Trust of New Zealand Euan McQueen, a former assistant general manager of the New Zealand Railways, who attended the 1987 opening.

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- Upper Hutt Leader


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