Students failing to grip helping hand

Last updated 05:00 19/08/2012

Relevant offers


One dead in crash at Greymouth Street Races Boy injured after hitting a cow while riding motorbike near Hunterville Men in monkey masks chase Timaru teens 9-year-old girl rescued from rip in Raglan Over 1000 houses were without power in East Auckland Fire at tyre shop in central Hamilton Surfers tried to save friend who drowned at coastal Taranaki break Woman escapes from second storey of burning Dunedin flat Labour Weekend drownings are reminder for the summer ahead Labour Weekend road toll stands at one so far as police urge caution

New figures show most of the students at 60 per cent of the institutions in the Government's Youth Guarantee Scheme fail to get a qualification in their first year.

Introduced in 2010 to keep 16 and 17-year-olds in education by giving them free vocational courses, the Government provided $52.7 million for 4000 places in 2010 and 2011.

In its first year, 18 institutes of technology and polytechnics, and 10 private institutions offered courses. But 2010 completion and qualification rates for institutes of technology and polytechnics, the most recent data, show less than half of the students qualified at 11 of the institutions.

At Unitec, Northland, Otago and Tairawhiti polytechnics, and the Christchurch, Waiariki and Waikato institutes of technology, less than a third qualified. Data for private institutions was unavailable.

The figures have led Labour to call for a review. Tertiary education spokesman Grant Robertson said while it was unrealistic to expect everyone to pass, the rates called into question whether the programme was working. "There are the best of intentions here. These are people who are struggling and we acknowledge they need support, but is this the right programme?"

Funding worked out at $13,175 a student, including $500 a head for pastoral care such as mentoring or parental/whanau involvement.

Tertiary Education Minister Steven Joyce said the low rates were because about half the students were on two-year courses, and others started one-year courses mid-year. "The numbers are much lower than you'd expect normally, and I'm confident they will go up significantly."

Ad Feedback

- Sunday Star Times

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content