Killer's motive still mystery for family

Last updated 05:00 30/11/2012
MURDERED: Scottish tourist Karen Aim was bashed to death by Jache Broughton in January 2008.
MURDERED: Scottish tourist Karen Aim was bashed to death by Jahche Broughton in January 2008.

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The family of murdered Scottish tourist Karen Aim are no closer to finding out why a 14-year-old beat their daughter to death.

Coroner Wallace Bain has published the findings of an inquest into the murder, for which Jache Broughton has already been sentenced to life imprisonment.

Last year, Ms Aim's father, Brian, told the inquest: "I would still like to know why he did it, but I don't think I ever will."

He agreed with Dr Bain's judgment that a lack of adult supervision of Broughton had contributed to the attack.

In his finding, Dr Bain found that Ms Aim, 27, died from head injuries on January 17, 2008, "as a result of being violently struck about the head".

The attack happened as she was walking home early in the morning after being out at Taupo nightclubs and bars.

Dr Bain highlighted an incident two weeks earlier when Broughton - who had been drinking vodka and was unsupervised by the grandparents and uncle he lived with - had hit a young woman repeatedly over the head with a rock.

"It certainly raised the issue as [to] what a 14-year-old boy is doing out on the streets of Taupo in the small hours of the morning with alcohol and predisposed, it seems, to such violent behaviour," Dr Bain said.

It also raised the question of whether those who should have been responsible for Broughton should be charged.

"As I said, the facts are chilling. I'm not convinced that anything positive can be recommended but the court will recommend that the findings be sent to the appropriate ministries as a classic example of what can happen when young people are not supervised."

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- The Dominion Post

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