Shock at teen's death from sting

CHARLOTTE SQUIRE
Last updated 10:41 04/02/2013
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EVA WILSON: Friends and family are shocked at the death of the 'happy, lovely' 14-year-old from Takaka.

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Family and friends in Golden Bay are reeling after a "happy, lovely" teenage girl died from an allergic reaction to a bee sting.

Eva Wilson, 14, died early on Saturday evening in Wellington Hospital.

"Anyone who knew her will be devastated," said family friend Peter Blasdale.

"She usually wore shoes, but that day she wasn't wearing any. She came home from school on Friday and trod on a bee on the deck. She had a worse reaction than usual. She ended up in Wellington Hospital. She died on Saturday evening."

Eva was flown to Wellington Hospital by the Nelson Marlborough Rescue Helicopter on Friday evening after she was stung at her home outside Takaka. Her allergy to bees was known before the incident.

She was treated by St John paramedics and doctors at the Golden Bay Medical Centre before being airlifted to Wellington for emergency medical care after going into anaphylactic shock.

"Eva's coming back tomorrow. There will be a service at Onekaka Hall on Friday," Blasdale said.

He said a lot of people were helping the family as much as they could.

"Kerry and Fraser [Eva's parents] have been here most of their lives, so a lot of people are helping them. It's a horrible thing.

"She [Eva] was lovely. She rode a unicycle a lot. She was often seen around town after school in the library car park.

"She was always smiling. A lot of teenagers could get a bit unfriendly, but Eva never was. She was always happy and smiling at everyone."

Anaphylactic shock can trigger an inflammatory response in several different body systems. In worst case scenarios, it causes cardiac and respiratory arrest.

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- The Nelson Mail

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