Little always wrong on ACC claims - Collins

ANDREA VANCE
Last updated 05:00 22/06/2012

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Cabinet minister Judith Collins says Labour MP Andrew Little's claim that she ordered ACC bosses to "go after" Michelle Boag are "wrong".

Mr Little used the protection of parliamentary privilege to say Ms Collins summoned chairman John Judge and chief executive Ralph Stewart to her office in Auckland and pressured them to complain to police about whistleblower Bronwyn Pullar. Ms Boag, a former National Party president, is Ms Pullar's advocate.

Ms Collins has repeatedly denied the claim she urged ACC executives to set the police on to Ms Pullar – who revealed a mass privacy breach involving more than 6000 claimants to The Dominion Post in March.

Ms Collins yesterday insisted: "He's just wrong and wrong and wrong. I'm just going to say this about Mr Little. He's just wrong. And again. He's always wrong."

She said of the fact that Mr Little had used parliamentary privilege, "that says everything".

The pair are locked in a defamation battle over previous claims made by Mr Little.

She also brushed off his claims that she is "a sociopath".

"I think he is under stress at the moment. And I forgive him."

ACC has been in turmoil since police threw out the complaint against Ms Pullar and Ms Boag. Mr Stewart and Mr Judge have resigned, two other board members have also left while another, Murray Hilder, confirmed on Wednesday he had quit rather than accept another term.

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- Fairfax Media

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