Official Information Act cover extended

VERNON SMALL
Last updated 05:00 05/02/2013

Relevant offers

Politics

Election 2017: Clash between home owners and generation rent looms Grant Robertson: Labour ready to deliver a fresh approach Prime Minister Bill English can't decide which pie to take Steven Joyce on Budget Day Auditor-General has to be held to higher standards MPs will be responsible for deaths if they don't act, says group petitioning for mental health inquiry Steven Joyce's first Budget is likely to provide an income boost for families Auditor-General Martin Matthews to stand down pending independent inquiry MacGregor accuses Craig of doctoring texts Good heavens! Blasphemy law remains in New Zealand after National and Maori Party vote down repeal Labour, Greens and National unite to solve cathedral deadlock

The Official Information Act will be extended to cover some aspects of how the courts work, but the Government has ignored calls for it to also cover Parliament.

It is also set to bring in new grounds for blocking the release of commercial information in response to recommendations from the Law Commission.

Justice Minister Judith Collins yesterday said the Government planned to press ahead with some of its key recommendations.

These included extending the freedom of information law to the administrative functions of the courts, including information about expenditure, resources and statistical information about cases.

There would also be new protections for commercial information and moves to clarify how the legislation applied to commercially sensitive information.

The Law Commission recommended a new withholding ground to protect competitive positions and financial interests in addition to the existing commercial withholding ground.

Ms Collins said there would also be new protections for third-party information and other issues related to the Privacy Act.

Greens spokeswoman Holly Walker said the Government's response was disappointing.

"The Law Commission recommended a substantive review and possible rewrite of the act, but instead the Government is tinkering around the edges . . . picking out the recommendations that suit it, like creating new ways of withholding information."

It was ignoring recommendations it did not like, including extending the OIA to cover Parliament.

The commission reviewed the OIA and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act. It found the legislation's underlying principles were sound and were fundamentally working well, Ms Collins said.

Ad Feedback

- The Dominion Post

Special offers
Opinion poll

Where do you stand on political coat-tail riding?

If it gets marginalised voices into Parliament, I'm for it.

I'm against it - if you don't get the votes, you shouldn't be there.

It's just part of the political game.

Vote Result

Related story: Voters reject riding on the coat-tails

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content