Explosively named firework banned

Last updated 11:01 08/02/2013

Relevant offers

World

New cyber attack causes mass disruption, hitting Europe hard Queen Elizabeth II gets a pay rise US prison inmate says he killed fellow prisoners to try and land on death row Mystery over dead man on road Princess Diana's late night calls to Camilla: 'I've sent someone to kill you' The Oxford English Dictionary has a new last word. Bet you can't pronounce it Celebrated author set to name book character after Grenfell Tower victim Hit by bus, then goes to bar Lockdown lifted after report of shooter at US military post, no injuries reported A mysterious Mars-sized planet may be hiding at the edge of our solar system

Chinese authorities have ordered retailers to stop selling fireworks named ‘Tokyo Big Bang’ because they could damage relations with Japan, an official with the fireworks’ manufacturer said. 

Relations between China and Japan have been tense lately as the two argued over who owns tiny islands in the East China Sea.

As a result, authorities have passed on the message that ‘‘China is a peace-loving country and we should not do something damaging to the China-Japan friendship,’’ said a manager at the Beijing Doudou Fireworks Company, which manufactured the fireworks in question. He gave only his surname, Yang.  

The name came from both patriotism and profit, he said. 

‘‘At the time when we designed the package and introduced the name of the product, we thought if they’re related to politics and trendy they could sell well. It’s also because we’re patriotic,’’ Yang said.  

‘‘When the products hit the market, they were really loved by customers and even sold out at some retailers,’’ he said.

‘‘We know the ban will hurt our profits, but it doesn’t matter as long as the national interests of our country haven’t been affected.’’

Fireworks are a major part of the festivities surrounding the Chinese Lunar New Year, which falls on Sunday and marks the beginning of the Year of the Snake.

Across the country, people set off fireworks throughout the day and night on the streets. Chinese traditionally believe the noise will fend off evil spirits and bad luck. 

At one store in central Beijing, boxes of the ‘Tokyo Big Bang’ fireworks were spotted earlier this week piled up in a backroom.

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content