Canadian-Russian spy jailed for 20 years

Last updated 08:28 09/02/2013
Jeffrey Delisle
SECRET AGENT: Naval intelligence officer Jeffrey Delisle during interrogation by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Nova Scotia.

Relevant offers

World

Sharkcyclone, not sharknado: Beast out of water in Queensland as Cyclone Debbie floods recede Cyclone Debbie's aftermath: Up to 500mm of rain predicted as major flooding forces evacuations Plank from boat 'made for Cheops' found near Great Pyramid at Giza Who is 'Source D'? The man behind the most salacious claims in the Trump-Russia dossier Ivanka Trump reverses course, will become a US government employee Takata faulty airbag saga: Toyota recalls 2.9m more vehicles worldwide, 6000 in NZ, over faulty airbags Kim Jong Nam's body to be flown to North Korea as part of deal to end row with Malaysia British woman torments neighbours with Ed Sheeran song Shakira opens seventh school in Colombia Sydney's population tops 5 million, extends the gap on NZ

A Canadian naval officer who handed over secrets to Russia for more than four years, damaging Canada's relations with the United States and other key allies, has been jailed for 20 years.

Sub-Lieutenant Jeffrey Delisle had pleaded guilty to breach of trust and handing information to a foreign entity that could harm national interests. He was also fined $111,817 (NZ$133,600), the sum he received from his Russian spymasters.

Delisle, 41, worked at a security unit in Halifax that tracked vessels entering and exiting Canadian waters.

Officials told a sentencing hearing last week that allies had threatened to withhold intelligence from Canada unless it tightened security procedures.

Canada shares sensitive information with the United States, Britain, New Zealand and Australia.

Delisle, unhappy after his marriage started to break up, walked into the Russian embassy in Ottawa in July 2007 and offered to sell secrets. He was arrested in January 2012.

He is the first person charged under a new secrecy law enacted after the September 11, 2001 attacks, which can carry a life sentence. Prosecutors had demanded a 20-year sentence while Delisle's lawyers argued a 10-year term would be appropriate.

Taking the time he served in pretrial custody into account, Delisle will spend 18 years and five months in jail.

Ad Feedback

- Reuters

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content