Iran captures enemy drone

Last updated 09:50 24/02/2013
RQ-170 Sentinal
Reuters

WIDE AWAKE: Members of Iran's revolutionary guard inspecting the US RQ-170 Sentinel spy drone they discovered in December 2011.

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Iran's powerful Revolutionary Guard says it has captured a foreign unmanned aircraft during a military exercise in southern Iran.

General Hamid Sarkheili, a spokesman for the military exercise, said the Guard's electronic warfare unit spotted signals indicating that foreign drones were trying to enter Iranian airspace.

Sarkheili said Guard experts took control of one drone's navigation system and brought it down near the city of Sirjan where the military drills began on Saturday.

"While probing signals in the area, we spotted foreign and enemy drones which attempted to enter the area of the war game," the official IRNA news agency quoted the general as saying.

"We were able to get one enemy drone to land."

Sarkheili did not say whether the drone was American.

Iran has claimed to have captured several US drones, including an advanced RQ-170 Sentinel CIA spy drone in December 2011 and at least three ScanEagle aircraft.

State TV said the Guard's military exercise, code-named Great Prophet-8, involved ground forces of the Guard, Iran's most powerful military force. State TV showed tanks and artillery attacking hypothetical enemy positions. He said various systems, including unmanned planes that operate like suicide bombers, were tested.

"Reconnaissance as well as suicide drones, which are capable of attacking the hypothetical enemies, were deployed and their operational capabilities were studied," the semi-official Fars news agency quoted him as saying.

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- AP

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