Peter Jackson binge-watched Netflix's Making a Murderer - here's what he thought

NETFLIX

He served 18 years for a crime he didn't commit. Now he's on the line again, and some want to see him put away for good.

Netflix's Making a Murderer occupied a lot of Kiwis' time - including Sir Peter Jackson's.

A post on the Lord of The Rings director's facebook page revealed his passion for the addictive documentary series, which documents the trial of Wisconsin man Steven Avery, who was sentenced to life in prison for a 2005 murder, and his nephew Brendan Dassey, who was convicted on charges relating to the murder.

The ten-part series debuted last December on the popular streaming service.

Peter Jackson has shared his thoughts about Making a Murderer.
CAMERON BURNELL/FAIRFAX NZ

Peter Jackson has shared his thoughts about Making a Murderer.

Jackson drew parallels between the trial of Avery and the 2012 movie West of Memphis, which he co-produced, which tells the story of three teenagers wrongly convicted of multiple murders in the early 90s. Jackson wrote that he believes Dassey is innocent.

READ MORE:
Making A Murderer subject Steven Avery files appeal*
Netflix takes a page from Serial in gripping documentary series Making a Murderer
Making a Murderer: White House responds to petition for release of Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey
What does Making a Murderer mean for justice around the world, and New Zealand?

 
Convicted murderer Steven Avery.
INNOCENCE PROJECT

Convicted murderer Steven Avery.

"It's only by watching the 10 hours of riveting documentary that you will really understand how faulty the US justice system currently is, and how badly it needs fixing," wrote the filmmaker.

"Before our West Memphis 3 experience, I found the concept of 'false confessions' a little hard to believe. Most confessions are obviously not false - and why on earth would anybody implicate themselves in a murder they had nothing to do with?"

Jackson directed his followers to a website for fans of the series, detailing how they can help Dassey.

"Unfortunately there are too many cases where police, under pressure to solve a case, set out to break a vulnerable young suspect - cleverly feeding them the details they want to hear," he wrote.

Ad Feedback

 - Stuff

Comments

Ad Feedback
special offers