Busker's eye-opening trick defies science

Busker does the impossible with eyes

CHARLIE GATES
Last updated 09:29 23/01/2013

Take a look at a busker who can move each eye independently!

hiro-pon
RULE BREAKER: Hiro-Pon, of Japanese double act Gamarjobat, can do the impossible with his eyes.

Relevant offers

Arts

Iconic Gallipoli painting expected to sell for 500k Tall Poppies retells some tall tales Art born out of hidden spaces Romeo and Juliet translated into Maori for Matariki Two Picasso etchings up for grabs in Hamilton Hamilton City Council gifts Clarence Street Theatre to new arts trust Art lovers chalk up $1m at New Zealand Art Show Cori Gonzalez-Macuer sees the funny everywhere Palmerston North film crew front a winner Palmerston North all-ages music venue set to celebrate

A Japanese busker is performing a trick so dazzling it defies science.

Hiro-Pon, of Japanese double act Gamarjobat, who is performing in Christchurch this week as part of the World Buskers Festival, has a trick where he can move each eye independently like a chameleon.

The trick caught the eye of leading Kiwi brain researcher Michael MacAskill when he saw the act in Christchurch a couple of years ago. He believed it was neurologically impossible, so he took the performer into a laboratory to record and analyse the eye movements.

His findings helped disprove a 19th-century scientific theory, known as Hering's law, that states both eyes move in unison and that this is hardwired into the brain.

"This was a bizarre case where someone was able to do something that we previously thought was impossible," MacAskill said.

"He is breaking that law in a very subtle way and shows there is a way to break that circuitry. It is an important discovery in a very arcane field.

"In essence, our eyes can be a bit more independent and chameleon-like than we thought."

His findings were published in a leading medical journal, Neurology.

Hiro-Pon was surprised at the scientific significance of his trick.

"That is a surprise. Wow. But it is so easy for me . . . I don't know why the scientist was so interested because everybody can do this, I think."

Ad Feedback

- The Press

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content