Brown slammed for calling Manila 'gates of hell'

Last updated 14:32 24/05/2013
Dan Brown
Reuters
DAN BROWN: Mocked by critics for his clunky style, but loved by millions of readers.

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Dan Brown's description of Manila as "the gates of hell" in the American novelist's latest book has not gone down well with officials in the Philippine capital.

The book Inferno, which is being sold in the Philippines, describes a visitor to the city who is taken aback by poverty, crime and the sex trade.

The chairman of metropolitan Manila, Francis Tolentino, wrote an open letter to Brown on Thursday, saying that while Inferno is fiction, "we are greatly disappointed by your inaccurate portrayal of our beloved metropolis."

Tolentino objects to the "gates of hell" description, and to Manila being defined by what he calls terrible descriptions of poverty and pollution.

He says the novel fails to acknowledge Filipinos' good character and compassion.

Inferno is already a best-seller a little over a week since its debut. The story drawn partly from Dante's epic again features Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, the protagonist for Brown's blockbuster The Da Vinci Code and its follow-up The Lost Symbol.

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