Lorde: Risque outfits mean nothing

Last updated 06:35 27/06/2014
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MARIO ANZUONI/Reuters
LORDE: "People should stop worrying about their daughters".

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Lorde doesn't think scantily-clad women are a bad influence on young girls.

The New Zealand-born singer is known for her grungy style and catchy pop tracks, but says stars that choose to dress in revealing clothes shouldn't be scorned.

"People should stop worrying about their daughters. I don't see a female without clothing as a terrible influence. There are worse things. Shooting people. Glorifying violence," Lorde fumed to Britain's ES magazine.

"A lot of people seem to think that all teenagers are super-misguided and not at all ambitious. Such a high proportion of the people my age I know are super-driven, super-focused and super-creative in a way I haven't seen a lot of adults being."

The star is a big fan of Rihanna's, a celebrity who's well known for courting controversy in risque outfits and references to drug taking.

Describing the Diamonds singer as "magnetic" Lorde couldn't help but gush over her idol.

"You can't not look at Rihanna. I would buy anything Rihanna sold me. The way Rihanna embodies being a sexual woman... She's so fearless and confident, I just love her," she smiled.

Lorde has been making waves in the music industry since the release of debut track Royals in 2013, a song that bagged her two Grammy Awards earlier this year.

She fully understands the struggles teenagers go through, but says young people should get more credit from the adult world.

"Teenagers are a lot wiser than you think. They have so many resources to make them wise now. But it will always be a constant that teenagers will not be as emotionally wise as adults," she sighed.

"You can be as sophisticated and precocious as you want, but you can't fake experience. That's what I find endearing about the art that teenagers make. There's something about that intensity."

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