No inquest into Charlotte Dawson's death

ANDREW HORNERY
Last updated 17:03 28/06/2014
Smh.com.au

A coroner has decided not to look into the suicide of Charlotte Dawson.

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Charlotte Dawson, in an image posted on her Instagram account the day before her body was found.

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Four months after she took her own life, there will be no coronial inquest into the death of Charlotte Dawson.

The NSW Coroner's Court received a brief of evidence from Kings Cross police last week and the matter has been finalised, effectively dispensing the need for an inquest.

The decision has surprised some of Dawson's friends, many of whom had raised concerns about the former model and television personality, especially surrounding her use of the controversial drug Baclofen.

Some of those friends had expressed their concern in a lengthy article on Dawson's death published in the Australian Women's Weekly this week, which claims that many doctors refuse to prescribe the drug in Australia, though Charlotte had managed to locate it via "Dr Google".

According to the article, the drug is normally used to treat the symptoms of multiple sclerosis, but which some people have started taking to try to "get their alcoholism under control".

"Yet Charlotte got some, somehow, and texted pictures of the box to her friends saying she hoped this would be the answer to her 'battle with the bottle'," the Weekly reported, adding that others had believed the same but with tragic consequences referring to the death of a beautiful British PR executive named Anna Sargent.

Sargent threw herself to her death from a bridge over the Thames after becoming addicted to Baclofen, which she too had been taking to try, as the Weekly put it, "cure her alcoholism".

The British coroner said: "This has been a very unhappy tale - Ms Sargent was a beautiful girl and she clearly loved her family".

Yet while the Weekly article raised the prospect of Dawson's use of Baclofen and other prescription drugs being investigated if a coronial inquest was held, this week's decision has effectively quashed any notions.

The article also set the record straight on several false accounts of what happened the day Dawson was found dead in her luxury Woolloomooloo apartment.

"The scene was not, as has been reported elsewhere, filthy. Charlotte did not die in squalor and she was not in debt to the landlord. There was no great stash of empty bottles strewn about the apartment and no overflowing ashtrays.

On the contrary, Charlotte had taken one of her favourite dresses - a floor length green number - out of the closet and slipped it on. She fixed her hair and she had stood in front of the mirror and applied a full set of lush, fake eyelashes, as if to ensure she'd look her best."

WHERE TO FIND HELP

If you or someone you know needs to talk, these are 24-hour helplines:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354

Youthline: 0800 376 633

Samaritans: 0800 726 666

If it is an emergency call 111

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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