Second ruling on Winehouse death

Last updated 00:42 09/01/2013
'UNEXPECTED TURN': Amy Winehouse at the Glastonbury Festival in 2008. A postmortem found that she had a blood alcohol level five times the legal driving limit after she died.
Reuters
'UNEXPECTED TURN': Amy Winehouse at the Glastonbury Festival in 2008. A postmortem found that she had a blood alcohol level five times the legal driving limit after she died.

Relevant offers

Celebrities

Dear North, tell the paps to go but chat with mum first Ruby Rose's film set prank ends in tears Spice Girls' Geri Halliwell Horner gives birth to son Uma Thurman details relationship drama with ex-fiance in court testimony Beyonce, Rihanna and other stars say 'thank you' to Barack Obama Charlotte Church to march with anti-Trump activists after snubbing inauguration invite Chrissy Teigan's attitude towards her stretch marks has us cheering Donald Trump inauguration: Celebrities share their opinions Jeremy Elwood & Michele A'Court: History will be made this weekend Sky TV's Stephen McIvor on the secrets of rain delays at the ASB Classic

A second coroner's inquest has confirmed that Amy Winehouse died of accidental alcohol poisoning when she resumed drinking after a period of abstinence.

Coroner Shirley Radcliffe ruled that the 27-year-old soul singer "died as a result of alcohol toxicity" and recorded a verdict of death by misadventure. She said there were no suspicious circumstances.

She said that Winehouse "voluntarily consumed alcohol - a deliberate act that took an unexpected turn and led to her death".

The Grammy-winning singer was found dead at her London home on July 23, 2011.

Radcliffe said a postmortem had found that Winehouse had a blood alcohol level five times the legal driving limit, and above a level that can prove fatal.

She said that that much alcohol could affect the central nervous system so much that a patient could "fall asleep and not wake up".

Winehouse's family did not attend the 45-minute inquest, which was held after the original coroner was found to lack the proper qualifications for the job.

The coroner later resigned after her qualifications were questioned. She had been hired by her husband, the senior coroner for inner north London.

The first inquest in 2011 produced an identical verdict. 

Ad Feedback

- AP

Special offers

Featured Promotions

Sponsored Content