Ozzy's fears for Sharon

Last updated 12:12 20/12/2013
Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne

FEARS FOR SHARON: Ozzy Osbourne is afraid his wife's workload will harm her.

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Ozzy Osbourne says he's afraid wife Sharon Osbourne's workload will seriously harm her.

Ozzy and Sharon have been married since 1982, and have stayed together despite plenty of rocky patches.

After 31 years of marriage, the Black Sabbath star is overwhelmed with love and admiration for his wife.

"I don't know how anybody can fly 11 hours, get off the plane and go straight to the studio. She must have a bit of astronaut blood in her or something," he told UK newspaper The Sun.

"When she was doing that Apprentice thing (in America in 2010) I was dumbfounded. She'd get up at four in the morning despite having the worst f***ing cold ever. I was like, 'Are you joking? Get back in bed!' But she went to the set, worked 'til whatever time. She's going to die."

The musician is determined to convince Sharon to slow down, and take better care of herself. According to Ozzy, nothing is worth this much stress and lack of free time.

"Is it all worth it? Nothing is worth killing yourself for. There comes a time when I think I'm sick of lying down over this. I don't understand it," he insisted.

But he admits Sharon is tough, and can handle anything. When she had a brush with cancer in 2002, Ozzy was amazed at his wife's strength.

"When she was diagnosed with colon cancer, that was for real," he said.

"We all thought we were going to lose her for a while. The chemotherapy she had is like getting a headache and getting a kick in the balls to take your mind off the headache.

"At the end of nine months' chemo, the doctor goes to me, 'You do realise this won't end here. She's going to spend the same amount of time getting over the chemo'. You try telling her that. As soon as she gets the all-clear, she goes off and she ain't stopped running since. I don't know what makes her work."

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