Jude Law appears in hacking trial

Last updated 06:50 28/01/2014
Jude Law
SUZANNE PLUNKETT/ Reuters
WITNESS: Jude Law arrives at court to give evidence in the phone-hacking trial of Rebekah Brooks.

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Film star Jude Law has told Britain's phone-hacking trial that for years the media had an "unhealthy" amount of information about his private life. But the actor said he was unaware until he heard it in court that a close family member allegedly sold stories about him to the tabloid press. 

Law said reporters and photographers used to hound him and even appeared at events he had organised secretly for his children.

''I became aware I was turning up at places having arranged to go there secretly and the media would already be there,'' said Law.

"There seemed to be an unhealthy amount of information that people, or someone, had, that meant they had access to my life and my whereabouts."

The jury was told that voicemail messages from Law had been found at the home of Glenn Mulcaire, a private investigator for tabloid newspaper the News of the World.

Law, 41, is the most high-profile figure to give evidence for the prosecution at the trial of two former Rupert Murdoch editors on charges of phone-hacking, which began at the end of October last year and is due to last until May.

Smartly dressed in a grey suit, Law said press attention  in his private life had increased significantly after he was nominated for an Oscar for The Talented Mr Ripley in 2001 and split from his then wife Sadie Frost.

Law said that when police showed him Mulcaire's notes, he was "shocked" at the amount of information accumulated, the BBC reported.

Defence lawyer, Timothy Langdale QC, suggested in court that some of the information in 2005 News of the World stories alleging an affair between Law's then-girlfriend Miller and actor Daniel Craig might have had another source Law's associates.

"I didn't know anyone around me was talking to the newspapers," said the actor.

Langdale asked Law if he knew that a member of his immediate family had been giving information to the News of the World in exchange for money.

"I was not aware of that," Law said. Asked when he first heard of the allegation, Law said: "Today."

Former News of the World editors Rebekah Brooks and Andy Coulson are on trial accused of conspiring to illegally intercept voicemail messages on mobile phones.

They are also accused of authorising illegal payments to public officials while Brooks faces charges of perverting the course of justice by attempting to conceal evidence from police.

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Brooks, Coulson and five others deny all the charges.

- Agencies

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