Tom Hanks tops trust list

Last updated 05:00 14/02/2014
Tom Hanks
ONE TO TRUST: Tom Hanks

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Tom Hanks has been named Forbes' Most Trustworthy Celebrity 2014.

The magazine uses E-Poll Market Research to compile the list, which analyses over 6000 celebrities on 46 different personality traits.

Carol Burnett was second on the list, and Morgan Freeman came in at number three. Michael J. Fox came in at number four and Betty White at five.

"Trustworthy, like influential, can be very subjective descriptors based on the nature of their celebrity. For the most part, it reflects how genuine people perceive that person to be," E-Poll Market Research president Gerry Philpott told Forbes. "It positively impacts a celebrity's 'brand' for getting top roles and endorsements if consumers see them as credible and believable."

Hanks' most recent film is Saving Mr. Banks, where he plays Walt Disney. In the movie, Walt was not above being a little dishonest with Mary Poppins writer P.L. Travers in order to win the rights to her work.

The 57-year-old took on the part under the agreement he could portray the mogul with complete accuracy.

"I think it's smart of them, it would have been easy for Disney to turn it into the 'Uncle Walt' version of it all - but I think if you're going to go back you've got to give it a little bit of teeth," Tom told Sky News.

According to the actor, he is aware of his "nice guy" reputation, but thinks the flaws are what made Walt interesting.

"It's not all about warts - but there are warts. Look, we know Walt had a temper - you're asking, 'Did this guy pay people as little as possible?' Then, yes," he told British magazine The Radio Times.

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