Frozen writer to turn A Wrinkle in Time into movie

RACHEL CLUN
Last updated 14:54 11/08/2014
a wrinkle in time
GETTING THE DISNEY TREATMENT: Madeleine L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time.

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The writer and co-director of Disney's smash hit Frozen has a new project - turning Meg Murray from the novel A Wrinkle in Time into Disney's next big heroine.

Jennifer Lee is writing the adaptation of the Madeleine L'Engle's book, which was one of her favourites as a child.

The science fiction novel stars 14-year-old Meg Murray, who travels the universe with her brother Charles Wallace and friend Calvin O'Keefe to rescue her scientist father.

With the help of three supernatural women, the trio journey to a dangerous world to save Meg's father from the evil IT.

Not only does Meg save her father, but she also saves her younger brother from the grasp of IT when her father can't.

According to Variety, Disney was impressed with Lee's take on the 1962 novel, emphasising the strong heroine storyline and creatively interpreting the supernatural worlds.

If the Hollywood version is successful there is enough material for a large franchise: A Wrinkle in Time is the first of five books in L'Engle's Time Quartet.

All of the Time Quartet novels feature Meg and the Murray family, and have time travelling and science fiction themes.

One notable lack in the novels, is there are no princesses.

Thanks to the Disney's major box-office success with Frozen - the movie is the company's biggest hit to date, taking nearly US $1.3 billion - the company have certainly learnt the importance of strong female leads.

While their speciality is still princesses Meg's story will be a refreshing change, allowing the company to show a different kind of female role-model.

Disney's adaptation won't be the first time the book has been made into a film, however.

A Canadian telemovie version aired on American channel ABC ten years ago, which was produced by Catherine Hand who is also set to co-produce the Disney version.

In an interview with Newsweek when L'Engle was asked if the Canadian version met her expectations, she responded: "Oh, yes. I expected it to be bad, and it is." 

A Wrinkle in Time won the 1963 Newbery Award, which is America's highest award for children's literature, and became a best-seller.

L'Engle passed away in 2007, so it won't be known whether the author approves or not of the soon-to-be-produced film.

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