Law suit over misleading film trailer

GILES HARDIE
Last updated 09:04 12/10/2011
Drive

CARS, JACK: Ryan Gosling stars in Nicolas Winding Refn's Drive.

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We've all been disappointed by a film that fails to live up to its trailer, but one American woman is suing the makers of Drive for failing to live up to its promo's promise.

Sarah Deming from Michigan, felt that the film's trailer promised a film similar to the Fast and Furious franchise.

Instead, the Ryan Gosling crime drama, which has received extraordinary consistent positive reviews, is a slow burning crime thriller whose only similarity to the Vin Diesel and Paul Walker film series is that Gosling's lead character is a driver and mechanic.

The unnamed anti-hero is a sometimes film stunt driver who moonlights as a getaway driver for hire. The core story of the film is unrelated to cars though, focusing rather on the relationship between Ryan Gosling and Carey Mulligan, and the extraordinary lengths he goes to in order to protect her.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Deming's lawsuit, filed against the film's distributor FilmDistrict alleges that they "promoted the film Drive as very similar to the Fast and Furious, or similar, series of movies."

"Drive bore very little similarity to a chase, or race action film ... having very little driving in the motion picture," Deming's suit continues. "Drive was a motion picture that substantially contained extreme gratuitous defamatory dehumanizing racism directed against members of the Jewish faith, and thereby promoted criminal violence against members of the Jewish faith."

The latter anti-semitic accusation appears to relate solely to the fact that one of the many underworld figures in the film is Jewish.

Deming's suit seeks a refund for her movie ticket as well as a halt to the production of "misleading movie trailers."

She is aiming to expand her individual case into a class action lawsuit, in order to allow other disappointed Drive attendees to share in the settlement.

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- Sydney Morning Herald

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