Bilbo's quest has plenty in it for trilogy

SAM BOYER
Last updated 14:54 01/08/2012

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Details of how The Hobbit films will pan out remain veiled, but a Lord of the Rings expert says there's more than enough Tolkien fodder to stretch the book into a film trilogy.

Sir Peter Jackson confirmed additional production for The Hobbit on Monday, with the movie series expanding from two films to three. A publicist for the films said no further details of the expansion could be revealed.

But David Harvey, a district court judge in Auckland, who won the titles for both the New Zealand and international versions of Mastermind in the early 1980s with the subject The Lord of the Rings, said information was available for an elongated Hobbit epic.

Detail from The History of Middle-earth - a 12-volume analysis of Tolkien's fiction, compiled by the author's son Christopher - and appendices from The Lord of the Rings could be used to extend the plot.

"If you wanted to provide more detail . . . the material is definitely there," Judge Harvey said.

Jackson has said that, without another film, much of the tale of Bilbo Baggins, the dwarves, the rise of the Necromancer (arch-villain Sauron in The Lord of the Rings), and the Battle of Dol Guldur would be missed out.

The battle, found in the Rings appendixes, as well as insight into the world of hobbits found in The History of Middle-earth, would add to the story, Judge Harvey said.

He said it would be Jackson's interpretation on the story but "Peter's got a reputation for being a wonderful story-teller and, if the past is anything to go by, it could be a wonderful story".

Judge Harvey, author of two books on Tolkien, was a consultant on Jackson's The Lord of the Rings.

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- The Dominion Post

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