Chef shows life on Ice

RACHEL YOUNG
Last updated 13:19 04/10/2012
Daniel Tobin

Rachel Young talks to film-maker Keith Reimink who made a film in Antarctica while working there as a chef.

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Living in Antarctica ranks as the "most difficult, most dangerous, most stupid, most wonderful" thing an American film-maker has ever done.

Keith Reimink's movie, No Horizon Anymore, was filmed during 13 months at the South Pole, where he worked as a chef.

The film, which he describes as part education and part entertainment, covers the reality of living in Antarctica before showcasing the crew, who tell their stories.

"There are funny moments and scary moments and certainly times when the audience will say, ‘I'm glad that's not me'."

The New York University film graduate started working as a chef in Alaska after fulltime film work proved elusive.

He spent three summer seasons at McMurdo Station, 13 months at Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and two winters at Palmer Station, working his way up from prep cook to supervisor.

"It is the most difficult, most dangerous, most stupid, most wonderful thing I have ever done and will ever do."

Reimink had some "close calls" while filming, including having to wait five minutes while the wind died down so he could find the route back to the station. "I still think about that and get a little sick."

No Horizon Anymore, which is Reimink's first film, will be shown at IceFest in Christchurch at 8pm today.

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