Homicide trial set for Bollywood star

Last updated 15:36 25/07/2013
Salman Khan
SET FOR TRIAL: Bollywood star Salman Khan

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Indian movie star Salman Khan will face trial next month on a homicide charge for a fatal road accident more than 10 years ago.

One man was killed and four people were injured when Khan drove his car into a group of homeless people sleeping on a Mumbai sidewalk in September 2002.

The court charged Khan with culpable homicide not amounting to murder, said Abha Singh, a lawyer involved in the case. Khan could face up to 10 years in jail if convicted.

The court also charged Khan with negligent driving and causing grievous hurt to the victims, Singh said Wednesday.

Khan, who was present in court, pleaded not guilty to the charges. The trial is scheduled to begin Aug. 19.

The court ruled that Khan, 47, would not have to attend every hearing but would have to appear in court whenever the judge required his presence.

The actor was earlier being tried in the case for the lesser offense of causing death by negligence, which carries a maximum penalty of two years in jail.

However, after a magistrate heard the evidence, he invoked the more serious charge of culpable homicide not amounting to murder against the actor in February.

Khan, one of Bollywood's most popular stars, has acted in about 90 Hindi-language films in his 25-year career.

Indian courts are notorious for delays and a trial can take years to complete.

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- AP

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