Film set uses red-zone recycling

Last updated 05:00 05/01/2014

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Stained-glass windows wood recovered from demolished Christchurch buildings will be used in a United States feature film.

A post-apocalyptic film being shot in Port Levy on Banks Peninsula this year will feature a small church built from materials salvaged in Christchurch.

The church will include stained-glass windows recovered by local company Graceworks and timber recovered from houses in the residential red zone by Silvan Salvage.

The film is produced by Spider-Man's Tobey Maguire and stars Chris Pine, best-known as Captain Kirk in recent Star Trek films, and Amanda Seyfried from Mamma Mia .

Graham "GT" Thompson of Silvan Salvage is recovering timber from nine red-zoned Avonside homes. The homes already had a second life - they were restored and illuminated by Australian artist Ian Strange for the Rise exhibition at the Canterbury Museum.

Thompson said a trailerload of timber from one of the red-zoned homes has gone over to Port Levy for the construction of the small church.

Thompson, who worked as a location scout on Heavenly Creatures, The Frighteners and X-Men Origins: Wolverine before moving into salvage, said the timber will be reused after filming to make picture frames and furniture.

"We need to reuse some of this stuff or it is such a waste," he said. "We salvage as much as we can from houses in the time we have available before they are demolished.

"You need a really good crew that can take these places apart properly and efficiently. It makes it much easier for the demolition company as they have less material to dump and the structure is easier to knock down."

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- Sunday Star Times

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